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Oldest Star In The Universe Discovered
Australian National University astronomers have found the universe’s oldest known star. They say it formed shortly after the Big Bang around 13.7 billion years ago.
"This is the first time that we’ve been able to unambiguously say that we’ve found the chemical fingerprint of a first star," said astronomer Stefan Keller in a university statement. 
The discovery, a relatively close 6,000 light years away from Earth, is letting researchers study the chemistry of early stars and giving them a better idea of the universe’s beginning. It was later confirmed using the Magellan telescope in Chile.
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The ancient star, called SMSS J031300.36−670839.3, was discovered at the Siding Spring Observatory using the SkyMapper telescope. Its discovery is part of a broader five-year project to produce the first digital map of the southern sky. SkyMapper has already photographed more than 60 million stars during its first year of operation.
The composition of their find indicates it formed in the wake of a primordial star that was 60 times the mass of our sun.
“To make a star like our sun, you take the basic ingredients of hydrogen and helium from the Big Bang and add an enormous amount of iron – the equivalent of about 1,000 times the Earth’s mass,” Keller said. “To make this ancient star, you need no more than an Australia-sized asteroid of iron and lots of carbon. It’s a very different recipe that tells us a lot about the nature of the first stars and how they died.”
Their work so far and further research into ancient star composition may resolve a long-standing discrepancy between observations and predictions concerning the Big Bang.
“The stars we are finding number one in a million,” said discovery team member Mike Bessell.
The discovery was published in the latest edition of Nature.
Top image: Stefan Keller with the SkyMapper telescope, courtesy of Australian National University. 

Oldest Star In The Universe Discovered

Australian National University astronomers have found the universe’s oldest known star. They say it formed shortly after the Big Bang around 13.7 billion years ago.

"This is the first time that we’ve been able to unambiguously say that we’ve found the chemical fingerprint of a first star," said astronomer Stefan Keller in a university statement

The discovery, a relatively close 6,000 light years away from Earth, is letting researchers study the chemistry of early stars and giving them a better idea of the universe’s beginning. It was later confirmed using the Magellan telescope in Chile.

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Who Will Win In The Fight Against Superbugs?

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by Txchnologist staff

Survival of the fittest has served humans and our ancestors well for millions of years. We have developed sophisticated defense mechanisms, like highly specialized senses and immune systems that can thwart many of our greatest threats. And for the things our immune systems can’t defeat, we have developed advanced medical techniques to combat infection and disease.

Of course, we’re not the only creatures capable of adapting. Like all other living organisms, bacteria are constantly evolving. And because they multiply quickly and in large numbers, their rate of change dwarfs our own.

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Robotic Prosthetics: How Close Are We To Restoring Sensation To Replacement Limbs?

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by Ysabel Yates

There are nearly two million people who are missing one or more limbs in the United States alone. Around the world, a number of research groups are working to advance robotic prostheses to restore a sense of normality to the lives of amputees.

Michael Goldfarb, a Vanderbilt University mechanical engineering professor, is at the cutting edge of these advancements. His lab is making robotic limbs more human.

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Mod Snake

by Txchnologist staff

From the biorobotics lab at Carnegie Mellon University comes this modular snake robot. According to the researchers, using the form of a snake allows the robot to navigate freely in many different environments, including networks of pipes and the gaps between walls. It can also climb stairs and trees.

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