science tech nanotechnology biologically_inspired_engineering virus membrane dna nanorobots medicine health cancer

Viral Membrane Protects Medical Nanorobots From Immune System

Scientists say they have developed a cloaking device to spirit medical nanorobots of the future past immune systems into diseased cells. Their innovation comes from stealing a powerful weapon viruses wield to infect their hosts.

Some viruses wrap themselves in a protective membrane to avoid detection by their host’s immune system and enter cells they are trying to infect. A team at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have been able to construct their own version of a viral membrane.

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Laser And Magnets Make Mobile Malaria Detector

by Marsha Lewis, Inside Science TV

It starts with a mosquito bite and can end in severe sickness and even death. Malaria claims the lives of more than one million people worldwide each year.

Spotting the disease is the first step toward treating it, but the current way to detect malaria is costly, time consuming and not very accurate.

“The people [who] were examining samples for malaria were having such a hard time getting the right answer. They were only right about half the time,” said Brian Grimberg, a biologist at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio.

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science vintage tech medicine medical_imaging pet_scan positron_emission_tomography radioisotope nuclear_medicine

A PET Prototype
This device from the 1960s is an early prototype of a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Lab built this circular version of the PET scanner to image small brain tumors and nicknamed it the Head-Shrinker.
PET scans work after radioisotope tracers are introduced into the patient. The imaging equipment picks up gamma rays emitted as a result of the isotope’s decay. The system allows for functional imaging of processes throughout the body. The device is now used for research and to diagnose certain cancers, brain diseases and heart problems.[[MORE]]

A PET Prototype

This device from the 1960s is an early prototype of a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Lab built this circular version of the PET scanner to image small brain tumors and nicknamed it the Head-Shrinker.

PET scans work after radioisotope tracers are introduced into the patient. The imaging equipment picks up gamma rays emitted as a result of the isotope’s decay. The system allows for functional imaging of processes throughout the body. The device is now used for research and to diagnose certain cancers, brain diseases and heart problems.

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Are Focused Sound Waves Medicine’s Next Big Thing?

by Michael Keller

The pictures on the left above show a patient with a benign bone tumor called an osteoid osteoma. The images on the right show the patient after doctors treated the tumor with focused ultrasound, a therapy that delivers high frequency sound waves inside the body without surgery.

Advocates for the technology say it is proving to be a useful and cost-effective treatment for a number of afflictions, from various cancers to neurological diseases.

“Focused ultrasound is increasingly being considered a game-changing technology,” said Kim Butts Pauly, a Stanford University professor of radiology. 

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