science health antibiotics eyes medicine protein bacteria
Killer Eyes: Naturally Antibiotic Protein Stops Infections

by Marsha Lewis, Inside Science TV

They are known as the window to the soul, each a different color, size and shape. But could your eyes also fight infections?

For years optometrists have been trying to figure out why the human eye is resistant to infection.

“What we know is people virtually never get corneal infections unless they’re a contact lens wearer or unless they have very severe injury to the cornea,” said Suzanne Fleiszig, an optometrist at the University of California, Berkeley.

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science optics physics optometry vision algorithms astronomy telescope eyes vision_correction eyewear contact_lens medical_devices
Stars In Your Eyes: Telescope Tool Coming To Eye Exams

by Michael Keller

Your next eyeglass exam might see an upgrade thanks to a high-tech astronomy tool developed to help see distant celestial bodies more clearly.

The technique, called wavefront analysis, takes precise measurements of how light reflected from the back of the eye exits. The difference between how light would be refracted through a normally shaped lens and cornea and how it is actually refracted creates a precise map of optical abnormalities known as higher-order aberrations. 

"Astronomers already used these techniques to enable a clear telescopic view of planets and stars, undistorted by the focusing aberrations resulting from the Earth’s atmosphere," says Dr. Anthony Adams, Editor-in-Chief of the journal Optometry and Vision Science. "In the past two decades, optometry and ophthalmology researchers have borrowed techniques for measuring and correcting these higher-order abnormalities.”

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tech optics insects lens eyes compound_eyes camera
Insect Eyes Inspire High-Tech Camera Optics

by Charles Q. Choi

Robots these days often take their inspiration from nature. Now cameras mimicking bug eyes that can look in many directions simultaneously can be made en masse, researchers say. These novel devices, each possessing hundreds of microscopic lenses, could find use as surveillance cameras on flying droids or in minimally invasive surgical operations.

The compound eyes of insects and other invertebrates are each made of up to thousands of relatively simple light-sensing facets known as ommatidia. These cover curved, hemispherical surfaces so that each points in slightly different directions. As such, compound eyes can have much wider fields of view than human eyes or regular cameras, including panoramic ones reaching nearly 360 degrees all the way around.

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tech biotechnology health biomedical_engineering medicine senses blindness eyes polymers
Polymer Artificial Retinas Inch Closer to Restoring Sight

by Charles Q. Choi

Artificial organic light sensors could one day help lead to eye implants that integrate more naturally with the body to restore vision, researchers say.

Blindness often involves damage to the retina, the light-sensitive inner lining of the eye. For instance, retinitis pigmentosa, a group of inherited diseases that afflicts 1 in 4,000 people across the world, involves degeneration of the eye’s light-sensing cells, or photoreceptors.

Research teams worldwide are developing retinal prosthetics that seek to restore vision using electronics that essentially replace lost photoreceptors. In just one vein of study recently receiving attention, neuro-ophthalmologists at the University of Tuebingen in Germany have been implanting light-sensitive microchips within eyes that are helping patients recognize facial expressions and see the faces of their loved ones.

However, current retinal prosthetics typically use electrodes made of inorganic semiconductors like silicon to interface with the body.

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