science medicine art performance dance musician ballet sports sports_medicine athletes
Performance Artists Could Use Some Serious Sports Medicine

by Chris Gorski, Inside Science

They endure long hours of oft strenuous practice. The way to get better is to practice more, even when injured. For hours at a time, their hearts can beat at 65 percent of their maximum rate. Injuries are common, and there’s always someone waiting to take your spot.

Life in the arts can be tough.

While athletes often have teams of trainers and doctors available to help, many of the insights developed in sports medicine have yet to move beyond the sidelines to the dancers and musicians that could benefit.

In May, at a meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine in Orlando, Florida, a number of scientists and physicians explained their work with everyone from ballet dancers to heavy metal rockers to classical musicians. They are taking a new approach to the arts — both the disciplines and the participants — in an effort to understand significant issues among recreational and professional artists.

Read More

44
44 notes
https://www.tumblr.com/reblog/90054230082/6d578soF
Permalink
text
tech 3d_printing art design medicine lighting plastic additive_manufacturing esof biomedical_science

Plastic Style

These plastic products have gotten a style upgrade from designers using 3-D printers. Two lamps and a 3-D printed heart made to help surgeons visualize complicated procedures before they begin are on display at the 2014 Euroscience Open Forum being held now in Copenhagen. 

The models, built by Belgian additive manufacturing company Materialize with support from the European Commission, calls attention to advancing artistic, medical and scientific applications for 3-D printers. 

All pictures by Michael Keller.

Read More

139
139 notes
https://www.tumblr.com/reblog/89858717760/PFN1N200
Permalink
photo
science physics fluid_dynamics surface_tension biology hydrophobic vortex water art photography

What Some Can Do With A Little Tension

These striking images of an insect that walks on the surface of water come from the lab of John Bush, an MIT applied mathematics professor. Bush studies fluid dynamics, focusing his science—and the art that often comes from it—on surface tension.

Visualized in the pictures above is the movement of the water strider, a bug that, according to Bush, stands on water through “surface tension force generated by curvature of the free surface.” It propels itself across the surface by rowing hydrophobic legs, which transfer momentum to the water by deforming the film-like surface and shedding fluid vortices as seen in these pictures. Click here to see a larger version of the top picture, which graced the cover of the journal Nature several years ago. Read the paper that describes the physics of water strider motion here.

The lab showed the vortices by floating Thymol Blue, a dye that is insoluble in water and is often used as a pH indicator, on the water’s surface.

We’ve featured work from the Bush lab before. Check out this story to see how you can play with surface tension to make fun cocktail boats driven by alcohol.

All images courtesy David Hu, Brian Chan & John Bush/MIT.

Read More

340
340 notes
https://www.tumblr.com/reblog/89167917285/tlXWcX0j
Permalink
photo
science tech nanotechnology pollution art poetry materials invention cleantech catalyst chemistry
Catalytic Coating Makes Pollution-Eating Billboards

image

by Michael Keller

I write in praise of air.  I was six or five
when a conjurer opened my knotted fist
and I held in my palm the whole of the sky.
I’ve carried it with me ever since.

That is the opening stanza from “In Praise of Air” by British poet, playwright and novelist Simon Armitage.

There’s beauty to this poem that goes beyond the ideas it conveys and the careful craftsmanship of the writer. The work doesn’t just praise the air, it clears it.

Or, more accurately, the 65-foot-high banner upon which the poem is printed clears it. That’s because the material is coated with nanotechnology that chews up airborne pollutants.

In Praise of Air, a collaboration between Armitage and physical chemistry professor Tony Ryan, has been unfurled on a building at the University of Sheffield in the UK to bring attention to Ryan’s innovation.

Read More

143
143 notes
https://www.tumblr.com/reblog/87229789370/tc4OJlW3
Permalink
text

LATEST