art fonts vintage general_electric fans welding steel electricity graphic_design illustration

We found these old brochure covers in the Internet Archive. One of them was produced in 1930 to highlight GE’s pioneering efforts in using arc welding to build steel structures like buildings, bridges and pile drivers. The technique is still important in making buildings and vehicles today.

The other brochure, produced in 1914—seven months before World War I plunged the globe into chaos—was a catalog showing the company’s offering of alternating- and direct-current electric fans. 

While it’s interesting to look back into history through these publications, we were taken by the beauty of the covers’ art and fonts. We hope you like them, too, and we’ll surely bring you more as we comb through the archives.

Read More

52
52 notes
https://www.tumblr.com/reblog/75707430081/FXvcOkST
Permalink
photo
science art design illustration biology birds ornithology audubon natural_history life_and_nature

by Michael Keller

Happy Birthday, John James Audubon! The famous student and painter of birds was born on April 26, 1785. In celebration of his great work, and of the conservation movement he helped inspire, we present a few examples of his illustrations.

All of these images come from his seminal work The Birds of America, printed in a series from 1827 to 1838. These drawings come courtesy of the digital collection of the New York Public Library, which includes many other illustrations from Audubon.

Above is an adult male whooping crane, which appears to be going for a meal of baby alligators. The bird is presently endangered.

Read More

15
15 notes
https://www.tumblr.com/reblog/48937045103/FbTQL2ms
Permalink
text
tech vintage machines transportation cities future_city future rare_books transit space television illustration design
The Future Machines of the Past

by Michael Keller

Our eyes here at Txchnologist are usually firmly set to the horizon, scanning for what the future holds. Sometimes, though, we get a kick out of turning around and seeing what the past’s modern technology looked like and how people back then thought about the future.

Today, we bring you a few good finds from the vault that capture the future machines of the past.

We start with the one above. It’s a 1947 advertisement from the Bohn Aluminum and Brass Corporation that showed the transportation of the future—presumably using Bohn’s aluminum and brass.

Read More

80
80 notes
https://www.tumblr.com/reblog/42271801785/tnzL3Xhl
Permalink
text

LATEST