tech science wireless power electricity nikola_tesla energy

Closing In On Wireless Power Transmission
Above is a close-up of what developers call a “superlens,” a device that can focus low-energy magnetic waves over a distance. The result—wireless power generation over nearly one foot of air between transmitter and receiver.
That might not seem like a great feat, but its Duke University creators say the superlens for the first time demonstrates that electricity can be sent efficiently and safely over a gap larger than either transmitter or receiver. It’s a significant step toward realizing Nikola Tesla’s century-old dream of transmitting energy without wires.

(This small copper coil and its twin were used in the experiment to send and receive power using electromagnetic fields. In the background is the metamaterial superlens that dramatically increased the power transfer’s range. Courtesy Guy Lipworth & Joshua Ensworth/Duke.)[[MORE]]
Top Image: Each side of each constituent cube of the superlens is set with a long, spiraling copper coil. The end of each coil is connected to its twin on the reverse side of the wall. Courtesy Guy Lipworth/Duke.

Closing In On Wireless Power Transmission

Above is a close-up of what developers call a “superlens,” a device that can focus low-energy magnetic waves over a distance. The result—wireless power generation over nearly one foot of air between transmitter and receiver.

That might not seem like a great feat, but its Duke University creators say the superlens for the first time demonstrates that electricity can be sent efficiently and safely over a gap larger than either transmitter or receiver. It’s a significant step toward realizing Nikola Tesla’s century-old dream of transmitting energy without wires.

(This small copper coil and its twin were used in the experiment to send and receive power using electromagnetic fields. In the background is the metamaterial superlens that dramatically increased the power transfer’s range. Courtesy Guy Lipworth & Joshua Ensworth/Duke.)

Top Image: Each side of each constituent cube of the superlens is set with a long, spiraling copper coil. The end of each coil is connected to its twin on the reverse side of the wall. Courtesy Guy Lipworth/Duke.

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